Code of Practice for Fatigue Management

The LR Hotshots Code of Practice and Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) will explain the importance that commercial vehicle driver well-being has on work performance and fatigue; and explain the importance of knowing the correct procedures and the importance of training and dealing with critical incidents.

Introduction

LR Hotshots will at all time show “Due Diligence” taking every precaution reasonable in the circumstances to protect the safety and health of their workers, customers and the general public.

In turn the need for better standards of safety and health has been matched by an increasing requirement for documentation of commercial vehicle driver operations and activities.

Commercial vehicle driver fatigue has long been recognised as a major safety problem in all forms of transport.

In other states of Australia, restrictions on hours of work and on-road enforcement using logbooks have traditionally been used to address this issue.

Western Australia did not go down this path to control fatigue. Instead Western Australia uses the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984 and The Occupational Safety and Health Regulations 1996 to require employers and employees to work together to achieve a SAFER road transport industry.

The LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) meets our duty of care, The Work Safe division of the Department of Consumer and Employment Protection.

This Code of Practice will explain in depth:

  • The basic principles for fatigue management contained in the OSH regulations and the draft code of practice
  • The steps in producing a company Driver Fatigue Management Plan
  • Commercial vehicle driver well-being
  • Administrative tasks necessary to ensure that policies, procedures and contingency actions are performed as required by the regulations
  • Policies necessary for dealing with critical incidents
  • The provision of training.
  • Operating standards for work and rest
  • The operating standards in the regulations are used to establish a safe system of work
  • The operating standards included in the regulations how provide a and plan a trip
  • Schedules and rosters for commercial vehicle drivers that best manage fatigue.
  • The standards emphasise the importance of sleep and the timing of work and rest.
  • The operating standards that offer flexibility in hours of work to reflect the geography of WA and the distances between towns.
  • The operating standards, as set out in the regulations, provide guidance to the authorities and the courts as well as providing guidance to operators.
  • The Work Safe division of the Department of Consumer and Employment Protection and the Department of Planning and Infrastructure use those standards when investigating an incident involving commercial vehicle driver fatigue or checking whether a safe system of work is in place.

Operating standards for work and rest in road transport

Transport operations must, as far as practicable, be conducted within the operating standards described below.

  • The 24-hour cycle starts at the commencement of work following a long break of 7 hours or more.

Operating standards for hours of work and rest:

Driving without a relief driver (Solo commercial vehicle driver)

  • Minimum continuous non work time in any 24 hours = 7 hours
  • Minimum non work time in any 72 hour period = 27 hours
  • Maximum time between major rest breaks (7 hours or longer) = 17 hours
  • Minimum 24 hour continuous periods of time not working in any 14 days = 2 periods
  • Minimum 24 hours continuous periods of time not working in any 28 days = 4 periods

Driving with a relief driver (two-up driving) for each driver

  • Minimum non work time in a 24 hour period = 7 hours
  • Minimum continuous non work time in any 48 hours (must be in a stationary vehicle or away from the vehicle) = 7 hours

OR

  • Minimum continuous non-work time in any 7 day period (must be in a stationary vehicle or away from the vehicle) = 48 hours

All commercial vehicle drivers

  • Maximum continuous work time (driving and non-driving work time) = 5 hours
  • Minimum break from driving for each 5 hours of work = 20 minutes
  • Minimum break from driving to be taken after 5 hours work = 10 minutes
  • Maximum work time in any 14 days (unless working to 28 day roster, then it is reduced to 144 hours) = 168 hours

The LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) sets out all of the requirements and procedures relating to how LR Hotshots will:

  • Schedule trips
  • Roster drivers
  • Establish a driver’s fitness to work
  • Educate drivers in fatigue management
  • Manage incidents on or relating to commercial vehicles
  • Establish and maintain appropriate workplace conditions.

The most effective way to reduce the risks associated with driver fatigue is by planned long-term measures. Rostering and scheduling practices are essential long-term measures, which are supported by short-term practices such as power naps and short breaks.

Managing commercial vehicle driver fatigue requires effective management practices and office procedures including:

  • Maintaining open lines of communication between management and commercial vehicle drivers
  • Encouraging feedback from commercial vehicle drivers
  • Ensuring that the DFMP is included in commercial vehicle driver induction programs and in other Human Resource procedures and practices
  • Appropriate documentation and record keeping practices.

Documentation of policies and procedures associated with the LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) provides practical evidence to manage commercial vehicle driver fatigue and allows the effectiveness of the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) to be measured.

The Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) documentation is well managed and includes numbered and dated systems in place for updating information.

Records provide the detail that the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) is effective  and all standards are being met.

Records are an essential part of the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) and LR Hotshots’s Risk Management Program (RMP) as they provide a history of a particular commercial vehicle driver, employee and Sub Contractor activity. Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) records may be of vital importance in any legal action.

LR Hotshots keeps all Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) records for a minimum of three years.

The Occupational Health and Safety Act 1984 require employers to provide their employees with a safe system of work.

LR Hotshots’s Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) has been put in place so as to ensure all employees and Sub Contractors have a safe system of work in place.

LR Hotshots’s Commitment to the Code of Practice for Fatigue Management for Commercial Vehicle Drivers & Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP).

  1. LR Hotshots will, at all times provide a commercial vehicle driver at least 24 hours’ notice to prepare for working time of 14 hours or more.
  2. LR Hotshots will, permit a solo commercial vehicle driver to have the opportunity for at least 7 continuous hours of rest in any 24-hour period, preferably between 10pm and 8am.
  3. LR Hotshots will, minimise irregular or unfamiliar work rosters.
  4. LR Hotshots will, operate flexible schedules to allow for sufficient breaks from driving or discretionary sleep.
  5. LR Hotshots will, minimise very early departures to give commercial vehicle drivers the maximum opportunity to sleep in preparation for the trip.
  6. LR Hotshots will, when commercial vehicle drivers return from leave, minimize night-time schedules and rosters to give drivers time to adapt to working long hours especially at night.
  7. LR Hotshots will, require a commercial vehicle driver to present and remain in a fit state for duty including not being impaired by alcohol or drug use.
  8. LR Hotshots will, provide an appropriate truck sleeper berth if commercial vehicle drivers will be required to sleep in the vehicle.
  9. LR Hotshots will, establish non-punitive medical screening for health fitness and sleep disorders. This will require regular assessment of all commercial vehicle drivers’ health by a suitably qualified medical practitioner (to the National Road Transport Commission or Federal office of Road Safety standard). This medical assessment will also include consideration other fatigue related conditions, Identify health problems that affect the ability to work safely, e.g. diabetes, heart disease, sleep apnoea.
  10. LR Hotshots will, provide appropriate employee assistance programs where necessary and practicable.
  11. LR Hotshots will, provide commercial vehicle drivers with information and assistance to promote management of their health.
  12. LR Hotshots will, provide a working environment that meets appropriate Australian standards for seating and sleeping accommodation.
  13. LR Hotshots will, when commercial vehicle drivers work a continuous rotating shift system of 5 days or more there must be 24 hours of non-working time between shift changes.
  14. LR Hotshots will, provide fatigue awareness training to all employees, sub-contractors and inform clients and enlist their cooperation.
  15. LR Hotshots will, incorporate the fatigue in the overall safety and health culture of the company.
  16. LR Hotshots will, obtain an undertaking from all employees and Sub Contractors to sign an agreement to cooperate with LR Hotshots’s Code of Practice for Fatigue Management for Commercial Vehicle Drivers & Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP).
  17. LR Hotshots will inform clients and enlist their cooperation with our Driver Fatigue Management Plan.
  18. LR Hotshots will, collect measures of effectiveness to evaluate our Driver Fatigue Management Plan.
  19. LR Hotshots will, ensure commercial vehicle drivers have had at least 27 hours of rest in any 72 hours, and have worked no more than 168 hours in a fortnight, if they are working to a 14 day roster, and no more than 144 hours in any 14 day period if they are working to a 28 day roster.
  20. LR Hotshots will retain trip records for commercial vehicle drivers for 3 years.

LR Hotshots fore fill their agreement to cooperate with the 20 Steps for the Code of Practice for Fatigue Management for Commercial Vehicle Drivers & Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) by;

Scheduling

LR Hotshots understands that a key factor in managing commercial vehicle driver fatigue is how we schedule or plan individual trips to meet a freight task.

  • All scheduling will include an appropriate pre-trip or forward planning to minimise fatigue.
  • A Commercial Driver or Sub Contractor of LR Hotshots will not be required to drive unreasonable distances in insufficient time and without sufficient notice and provision for adequate rest recognising that the main risk factor for fatigue crashes is inadequate sleep for one or more nights.
  • LR Hotshots’s procedures recognize that at least 6 hours of sleep is required each night to minimize fatigue, therefore minimum of 7 continuous hours break will be planned for, to ensure a commercial vehicle driver has the opportunity for at least 6 hours of actual sleep. This is an absolute minimum and may still lead to increased levels of fatigue over a number of days and taking this into account schedules will be developed that provide this or greater opportunities for sleep.
  • LR Hotshots’s scheduling practices will not put the delivery of a load before a commercial vehicle driver’s safety or health.

Fatigue Management Plan for Commercial Drivers

The second main risk factor for fatigue crashes is working when the commercial vehicle driver would normally be asleep. People who work at night have trouble adjusting their body clocks. No matter how much sleep a person has beforehand, they will still feel sleepy between 1.00am and 6.00am.

LR Hotshots’s recognize that driving during this period puts employees and other road users at risk and our schedules are developed with this risk in mind, and that where possible there is the opportunity to sleep during this period.

Rostering of commercial vehicle drivers

Rosters are the commercial vehicle drivers planned pattern of work and rest for a week or more. A commercial vehicle driver’s roster and workload should be arranged to maximize the opportunity for them to recover from the effects or onset of fatigue.

  • LR Hotshots’s rostering practices are in accordance with the OSH regulations.

Night shift work and rotating or irregular shift patterns are risk factors for fatigue crashes.

  • LR Hotshots limits the risk factors by minimising night work if it cannot be eliminated.

Other factors to be taken into account

LR Hotshots scheduling and rostering will ensure that:

  • A commercial vehicle driver is given at least 24 hours’ notice to prepare for working time of 14 hours or more.
  • A commercial vehicle driver is not permitted to exceed 168 hours of working time in any 14 day period.
  • Total non-working time in any 72 hours is at least 27 hours.
  • A solo commercial vehicle driver has least one continuous 7-hour period of non-work time in any 24-hour period and preferably between 10pm and 8am.
  • Continuous periods of work time do not exceed 5 hours before a break of at least 10 minutes is taken.
  • A schedule must allow for an average of 20 minutes breaks from driving for each 5 hours of work time for a commercial vehicle driver, and a minimum break from driving of at least 10 consecutive minutes at the end of 5 hours’ work time.
  • Maximise the opportunity for sleep and to prepare for a trip by minimizing very early departures.
  • A commercial vehicle driver has at least two continuous period of 24 hours non-work time in 14 days.
  • Minimise irregular or unfamiliar work rosters.
  • Minimise schedules and rosters that depart from daytime operations when commercial vehicle drivers return from leave: commercial vehicle drivers returning from leave require time to adapt to working long hours especially at night.
  • Ensure 24 continuous hours of non-work time between shift changes when commercial vehicle drivers work a continuous rotating shift system of 5 days or more.
  • Time doing work that is incidental to the driving, such as servicing and maintaining the vehicle or operating mobile plant is counted as work time and needs to be taken into account when planning trips.

Control measures

To ensure LR Hotshots complies with the operating standards the following practices have been adopted for when a commercial vehicle driver is likely to work more than 14 hours in consecutive 24-hour periods.

  • Replace commercial vehicle driver with a fresh relief driver, where practicable.
  • Reduce the period of work time in the next 24-hour period to ensure that at least 27 hours of non-work time is available in any 72 hour period, to recover from the effects of any accumulated sleep debt.
  • Set schedule so commercial vehicle driver can rest when and where most appropriate.
  • Use shared driving, driving with a relief driver (two-up driving).
  • Split trip into shorter continuous driving periods.
  • Schedule rest to precede or coincide with high fatigue risk times, e.g. night and dawn.
  • Change customer pick-up or delivery times.
  • Allow for a day of non-work time after a trip.
  • Remove or modify tasks incidental to the driving, such as loading / unloading, refuelling etc., that it is not necessary for the commercial vehicle driver to perform.
  • Ensure a commercial vehicle driver’s roster is as regular as practicable.
  • Employ a commercial vehicle driver on light non-driving duties at the depot to allow sleep at home.
  • Ensure a solo commercial vehicle driver has the opportunity for at least 7 continuous hours of rest in each 24-hour period and preferably between 10pm and 8am.
  • Ensure the commercial vehicle driver has access to medical or other appropriate assistance.
  • Develop policies covering fitness for duty in consultation with employees and unions.
  • Train commercial vehicle drivers in the risk factors that may affect fitness for duty and provide relevant control measures.
  • LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) requires that commercial vehicle driver schedules are designed “as far as practicable” to operate within the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) at all times offering operational flexibility and taking into account remote area operations and the distances that must be travelled.
  • Commercial vehicle drivers working to the maximum extent allowed by LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) will in most cases be working to their capacity.
  • LR Hotshots understand that Commercial Drivers may mean that they are not able to maintain acceptable levels of alertness beyond the hours recommended in the operating standards and recognise that there will be instances where some additional time is required, for example, if a commercial vehicle has been held up due to unforeseen circumstances such as a road accident, and is a short distance from home, and the commercial vehicle driver is alert enough to safely complete the trip, then this may be acceptable, however where it becomes evident that it is a regular occurrence, the schedule will be adjusted accordingly to comply with the LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP).

Commercial vehicle driver well-being

Readiness for duty

  • To meet LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP), readiness for duty means a commercial vehicle driver must be in a fit state for work when presenting for duty.
  • Commercial vehicle drivers made aware of the impact of activities such as a second job, other driving, recreational activities, sport, insufficient sleep, consumption of alcohol and drugs, (prescribed or otherwise), and stressful situations. These activities will impact on a commercial vehicle driver’s well-being, and capacity to work effectively. These activities may affect their state of fatigue, especially cumulative fatigue, and consequently their capacity to drive safely.
  • LR Hotshots commercial vehicle drivers and Sub Contractors are required to detail the importance of fitness for duty both at the start of and during work time.
  • All commercial vehicle drivers will be asked to declare their fitness for work prior to receipt of the pre-trip, prior to commencing work, and all LR Hotshots commercial vehicle drivers are required to txt their Manager, Supervisor after each scheduled break with the following information.

A: Driver Name.

B: Location.

C: Time break commenced.

D: Time break completed.

E: Status of fitness (i.e. fit or unfit)

Commercial vehicle driver health and fitness

  • The health and fitness of commercial vehicle drivers is an important issue when considering how to manage the risk of fatigue and this directly affects a commercial vehicle driver’s ability to deal with the stresses and demands of the job.
  • Poor driver health can result in a number of consequences including the need to find a replacement commercial vehicle driver when a commercial vehicle driver is no longer able to work. It may also result in poor customer service due to late deliveries or re-scheduling.

Some of the more common health problems that commercial vehicle drivers may experience include:

  • Obesity and heart disease – Being overweight or obese is strongly related to high cholesterol levels in the blood and high blood pressure. Both of these factors greatly increase the risks of having a heart attack.
  • Diabetes – Diabetes is an illness in which an individual’s blood sugar level is out of control. If not controlled, diabetes can make an individual feel fatigued. Diabetes can occur in anyone and at varying degrees, but it is easy to control.
  • Being overweight and not exercising, strongly contribute to the development of diabetes.
  • Sleep apnoea – Sleep disordered breathing or apnoea is a serious problem for individuals that snore. In these people the windpipe collapses during their sleep resulting in too little air getting to their lungs. This wakes them up and usually wakes their partners as well. This can happen repeatedly during a night and results in poor and little sleep.
  • The LR Hotshots Health Management System (HMS) has been developed and implemented to identify and assist those commercial vehicle drivers who are at risk.
  • The LR Hotshots Health and Management System (HMS) includes, medical history, sleep disorders (including those caused by the commercial vehicle drivers family or partner, broken sleep due to children’s needs etc.), diet, alcohol, substance abuse or dependency and lifestyle.
  • The LR Hotshots Health and Management System promotes better health management.
  • Commercial vehicle drivers are required to have medicals every three years. Commercial vehicle drivers who are required to undertake medicals for other purposes e.g. to transport dangerous goods or working on clients sites where additional medicals are a requirement, will be required to complete same as requested.

Workplace conditions

Unsafe and unsuitable workplace conditions contribute to fatigue. The ergonomic design standards of a vehicle cabin are important if a commercial vehicle driver is to operate a vehicle safely. Unsuitable depot facilities may prevent commercial vehicle drivers from having adequate rest and thus reducing the effects of fatigue.

  • LR Hotshots workplaces comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984, its associated regulations and relevant Australian Design Regulations (ADR’s).
  • LR Hotshots workplace conditions meet Australian standards for seating and sleeping accommodation and in particular that vehicle/ truck cabins are well ventilated; seating suspension is adjustable to the commercial vehicle drivers height and weight; vehicles used for sleep during periods of non-work time are equipped with appropriate sleeping accommodation; and depots provide safe and suitable rest facilities that meet occupational safety and health standards.
  • Vehicles that operate north of the 26th parallel between 1 October and 31 March are air conditioned and, if the vehicle is used as alternate sleeping accommodation the air conditioning is able to run continuously while the vehicle is stationary.

Training

  • At LR Hotshots we consider training as critical and have developed excellent procedures to manage safety in our business. All LR Hotshots Employees and Sub Contractors whose work contributes to the Management of fatigue for commercial vehicle operations, covered by the LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP).

Safe T  Transport believe that crashes due to commercial vehicle driver fatigue are entirely preventable with correct scheduling practices followed and training and education on the causes and prevention of fatigue.

  • Training is of critical importance in helping to ensure that LR Hotshots procedures are known, understood and followed by all employees.
  • The training will be carried out according to the LR Hotshots written procedures at Induction, refresher and further training as deemed necessary.
  • When new employees or Sub Contractors join LR Hotshots they will undertake training to give them an immediate awareness of the company’s driver fatigue management plan.
  • Further training of the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) will then occur before a commercial vehicle driver undertakes any trips or rosters that involve 14 or more working hours.
  • If there are any changes to procedures as the result of an investigation into an incident, or commercial vehicle driver feedback, then employees and Sub Contractors must be retrained in accordance with the revised procedures.
  • Refresher training at intervals for all employees should be undertaken yearly.

Form & content of training

  • LR Hotshots Training consists of formal, written, and on the job instruction, combining the theory with the practical application. The Training is by means of objective assessment, to ensure that the employee – Sub Contractor being trained has acquired the necessary competencies. This could take the form of a supervisor observing first hand that the person being trained follows the procedures correctly.
  • In the case of a commercial vehicle driver it will include review of all trip records to assess the correct application of the company DFMP procedures.

DFMP training includes information on:

  • LR Hotshots’s duties imposed on commercial drivers and employees in relation to the Driver Fatigue Management Plan and the regulations.
  • General duties imposed by the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984
  • Penalties associated with failure to comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984 and Regulations;
  • The causes of commercial vehicle driver fatigue, its symptoms and particular effects on heavy commercial vehicle safety including the direct and indirect costs;
  • The policy and procedural factors that may increase the risk of commercial vehicle driver fatigue during operations; and
  • The management of commercial vehicle driver fatigue including the use of napping, and strategies for making lifestyle changes.
  • The training will enable a trainee to reach the required level of competence and have a competency standard.
  • The trainer will have required technical skills and knowledge of relevant truck transport operations and the LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) and the  training skills to impart this knowledge to others
  • The trainees be afforded  the opportunity to ask questions and are encouraged to do so until such time they are satisfied with the response. The Trainer will use examples that Trainees are familiar with from within the industry.
  • LR Hotshots understands that it is important to recognize that some Trainees may not easily understand written instructions and a briefing or training session would assist them overcome any problems they may have. If you fall into this category it is important that you advise the trainer.
  • LR Hotshots training provides the opportunity to reinforce the importance of the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) by pointing out the consequences of failure to observe procedures, and what your body is telling you. To achieve this require level of training required the trainer will provide examples of serious crashes that have occurred through failure to correctly manage commercial vehicle driver fatigue are a good way of achieving this.

Here is a good example of a story told in the ACT Supreme Court

Operator sued for pushing commercial vehicle driver

Transport companies have been placed on notice after the ACT Supreme Court awarded $389,411 to a truck driver who crashed after being pressured to work excessive hours. The court was told his employer had made the truck driver drive 3671km in 3½ days, during which time he had been able to sleep for only 14 hours.

The court heard that the driver had arrived in Wagga around 9pm after driving several thousand kilometres in the previous days. Upon arrival in Wagga Wagga he had received a phone call from his supervisor telling him to hurry up because he had another job near Tumbarumba and he had to arrive there by 3.40am the following morning.

The driver said he had told his supervisor that “he was buggered” and could not do the job and he had been told. “Either you do the job or get your gear out of the truck. If you can’t handle the job, get out”.

The following morning the driver crashed his semi-trailer outside Tarcutta after falling asleep and suffered significant injuries, with rescue crews taking five hours to free him from the wreckage before he could be flown to hospital.

The case was heard in the ACT because the driver was treated at Canberra Hospital. In his May 23 judgement, Justice Terence Connolly found the Haulage Company had breached its duty of care to its employee and had failed to provide safe working conditions by ensuring he only worked a safe number of hours.

“Ordinarily, an accident which occurs in these circumstances might not be thought to give rise to a claim in damages, in that the accident could be said to have occurred solely due to the fault of the plaintiff in falling asleep at the wheel… [but] he fell asleep at the wheel because he was required to drive well in excess of safe hours and distances,” Justice Connolly said.

The driver was convicted for negligent driving by NSW Police, who said the basis of the accident was fatigue caused, by driving for excessive hours.

A report from Associate Professor, Ron Grunstein from the sleep disorders centre at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney presented to the court said truck drivers in Australia were frequently exposed to acute and partial chronic sleep deprivation. “This is frequently an occupational reality in the Australia Transport Industry,” the report found.

The court was also told drivers kept two logbooks, one that was false, to show to authorities they were complying with regulations.

The company was ordered to pay the plaintiff $389,411 as well as his legal costs.

Administration Responsibilities

  • LR Hotshots understands that the success the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) is dependent on, employees, their clients and commercial vehicle drivers knowing and carrying out their responsibilities, to ensure the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) policy, procedures and contingency actions are performed as required by the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP).
  • All responsibilities included in the Driver Fatigue Management Plan are defined and written in to job descriptions, and kept current.

Administration Documentation

  • LR Hotshots keeps records of all regular and irregular trips, commercial vehicle drivers’ schedules and rosters. These are based upon trip sheets or pay records and delivery dockets. They documents must detail information in relation to work time, breaks from driving and non-work time, to demonstrate that LR Hotshots and its commercial vehicle drivers are conforming to the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP), and the Occupational Safety and Health Regulations.
  • Documentation and records will detail how LR Hotshots and there commercial vehicle drivers address the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) and its operating standards and if the standards are not met, how control measures are put in place.
  • Procedures for maintaining personnel records (kept on a confidential basis) are detailed. These records include information on any work restrictions imposed, or applicable rehabilitation programs, and copies of current medical certificates.
  • All those responsible persons at LR Hotshots, commercial vehicle drivers and Sub Contractors are trained in completing and maintaining the forms and documentation that support LR Hotshots’s Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP).

Administration managing incidents

  • LR Hotshots recognises the fatigue leads to inattention and errors in judgement and may be an underlying cause of seemingly minor incidents and the fatigue, as a causal factor, should not just be considered in respect to serious crashes, as it could be contributing to minor incidents.
  • The LR Hotshots Incident Reporting System (IRS) increases the chance of a complete, competent and caring response to selected events. Incidents reports are required to include those causing injury or damage but just as important, those with potential to have caused serious injury or damage. (Near Miss)
  • The LR Hotshots Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) requires all unsafe incidents to be recorded. This information will be collected to target unsafe practices and prevent future injuries and damage.
  • LR Hotshots policies promote and encourage all employees and sub-contractors to report all unsafe incidents (including those that are potentially dangerous) (Near Miss), and a review of the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) for procedural shortcomings be undertaken after any unsafe incident.

Reviewing the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP)

  • LR Hotshots understand that it is only by being thorough and ensuring all incidents are reported on the LR Hotshots Incident Reporting System (IRS) and risks are assessed and controlled serious injuries and deaths will be prevented in the workplace.
  • Audit & review of the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) to ensure it is adequate, is undertaken following any unsafe incident, which either caused or had the potential to cause injury or damage
  • Random reviews of the Driver Fatigue Management Plan (DFMP) will take place to ensure procedures are being followed with the purpose of a review to ensure there is sufficient information gathered for action to be taken to prevent any future occurrence of the unsafe incident and those procedures are developed or modified to prevent any further harm or injury.

LR Hotshots Systems and methods of compliance Policy

  • Commercial vehicle driver is given at least 24 hours’ notice to prepare for working time of 14 hours or more.
  • Continuous periods of work time do not exceed 5 hours.
  • Flexible schedules permit breaks from driving or discretionary sleep.
  • A solo commercial vehicle driver must have the opportunity for at least 7 continuous hours of rest in any 24 hours, preferably between the hours of 10pm and 8am.
  • Maximise the opportunity for sleep to prepare for a trip by minimising very early departures.

LR Hotshots Trip rostering practices Policy

  • Commercial vehicle driver does not exceed 168 hours working time in 14 days.
  • Commercial vehicle driver has at least two periods of 24 continuous hours non-work time in 14 days, or 4 periods of 24 continuous hours in 28 days
  • Minimise irregular or unfamiliar work rosters.
  • An appropriate truck sleeper berth is available if sleeping in the vehicle.
  • Minimise working time in irregular or unfamiliar work rosters.
  • Minimise schedules and rosters that depart from day time operations when commercial vehicle drivers return from leave.
  • Total non-working time is at least 27 hours in any 72 hours.
  • Solo commercial vehicle driver has at least 7 continuous hours of rest in any 24 hour period (preferably between 10pm and 8am).
  • Schedule allows for 20 minutes breaks from driving for every 5 hours work time.
  • Minimum break from driving of at least 10 consecutive minutes after 5 hours work time.

 

LR Hotshots Commercial vehicle driver readiness for duty policy

  • A commercial vehicle driver is required to remain in a fit state for duty including not being impaired by alcohol or drug use.
  • A written policy on fitness for duty
  • Commercial vehicle driver health practices (including any relevant publications or information brochures)
  • Commercial vehicle drivers’ health is assessed regularly by a suitably qualified medical practitioner to the NRTC or FORS medical assessment of commercial vehicle drivers standard.
  • Medical assessment includes consideration of sleep disorders and other factors that contribute to fatigue.
  • Identify health problems affecting ability to work safely, e.g. diabetes, heart disease.
  • Provision of appropriate employee assistance programs.
  • Commercial vehicle drivers are provided with information and assistance to promote management of their health.

LR Hotshots Workplace conditions policy

  • A working environment meeting appropriate Australian Standards for seating and sleeping accommodation.
  • Minimum standard for truck sleeper berth is ADR 42.
  • A vehicle cabin should meet the requirement of the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984 (including as a minimum ventilation in accordance with ADR 42.20 and seating suspension that is adjustable to a commercial vehicle drivers weight and height)
  • The commercial vehicle operator should ensure depots provide safe and suitable facilities that meet the requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984
  • Truck cabins should be air conditioned where practicable, comfortable and the system checked before the trip commences.
  • Vehicles used above the 26th parallel between 1 October and 31 March are air-conditioned, and if used as alternative sleeping accommodation while the vehicle is stationary, a system which can be run continuously should be provided.

LR Hotshots Training and education practices policy

  • Duties imposed by the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984
  • The penalties for failure to comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984
  • Identify the causes of commercial vehicle driver fatigue.
  • Recognise the symptoms of fatigue, develop strategies to enable better management and assist in making lifestyle changes, including conducting risk assessments and applying control measures.
  • Prevention of commercial vehicle driver fatigue.
  • All managers, supervisors and commercial vehicle drivers participating in the DFMP
  • Developing a Fatigue Management Plan for Commercial Vehicle Drivers and Operators are trained in how to manage commercial vehicle driver fatigue, including factors that cause and affect fatigue.

LR Hotshots Development and Maintenance of Driver Fatigue Management Policy (DFMP) Policy

  • Commercial vehicle operators management staff, commercial vehicle drivers, Sub Contractors and other employees involved in the operation of the DFMP are trained in the operation, administration and verification of the DFMP.
  • DFMP operation, administration, verification and participation. Refresher training and education needs are identified, documented and provided to employees.
  • Training and education programs are documented and employee participation is recorded.
  • Requirements for the responsible person at the workplace and other staff involved in the management, operation, administration, participation & verification of the DFMP
  • LR Hotshots has developed the DFMP in consultation with commercial vehicle drivers, Sub Contractors and clients.
  • Duties LR Hotshots, commercial vehicle drivers and Sub Contractors falls under the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984
  • Maintaining records of trip schedules, rosters, work time, breaks from driving and non-work time, and any other information necessary to demonstrate that the Company conforms to its DFMP.

LR Hotshots Documentation and records Policy

  • A DFMP System documents how LR Hotshots its commercial vehicle drivers and Sub Contractors conform to the Operating Standards and when the standards are not met, how this is dealt with.
  • Records that document all work time, breaks from driving and non-work time, commercial vehicle driver’s schedules, including rosters.
  • Records include all trips performed, including details of any trip alterations. They show sufficient information to determine that the company and the commercial vehicle driver have conformed to the DFMP.
  • Personnel records that include copies of current medical certificates and applicable rehabilitation programs are kept on a confidential basis.
  • Records are kept for a minimum of 3 years.

LR Hotshots Management of incidents Policy

  • Procedures are in place to monitor record and investigate all incidents and to take corrective action as soon as is practicable.
  • Sufficient information for action to be taken to prevent future occurrences of the identified cause of the unsafe incident.
  • LR Hotshots policies promote and encourage all employees, sub-contractors and relief staff to report all unsafe incidents including those where there has been no injury or damage.

LR Hotshots Alcohol and Other Drug (AoD) Policy

  • LR Hotshots is committed to implementing and monitoring an Alcohol and other Drug (AoD) system. LR Hotshots has a ZERO tolerance to alcohol and drugs in our workplace. Individuals that choose to work under the influence of alcohol and other drugs pose a considerable risk to the safety of themselves, the public and their fellow work mates.
  • Anyone on site found to be in possession or consuming alcohol or illegal drugs or working under the influence of alcohol and other drugs will be required to leave the workplace and may have their employment terminated.
  • The aim of this policy is to ensure that LR Hotshots and its employees conform to legislative requirements and to ensure the provision of a safe workplace for all staff.

Senior Management

  • Senior management is accountable for ensuring the effective operation of the AoD
  • Programme in their areas of responsibility so as to ensure that all LR Hotshots all employees and Sub Contractors understand and support the LR Hotshots AoD policy and understand the standard AoD procedures for testing and that adequate resources are provided to monitor conformance with the policy.

Supervisors

  • Supervisors are accountable for ensuring that all Employees and Sub Contractors are aware of and comply with the provisions of the LR Hotshots AoD policy. They are also responsible for assessing the fitness for work of employees and Sub Contractors under their control and taking prompt and appropriate action to address declining safety as a result of alcohol or drug misuse.

 Employees, Sub-Contractor and Contractors

  • All LR Hotshots Employees and Sub-contractors are accountable for ensuring that they are not in an unfit state for any reason and are required to raise any concerns about their own and/or another persons’ fitness for work; and notifying their supervisor/manager of any situation in which this policy may have been breached, including;
  • Unauthorised possession or consumption of alcohol or drugs on site or during work;
  • Failure to provide details to their supervisor or manager of prescription medication and associated limitations to carry out normal duties (medical confidentiality will be strictly maintained).
  • LR Hotshots conducts alcohol self-breath testing, pre-employment testing, regular random testing and for cause testing.
  • LR Hotshots provide employees and Sub Contractors Testable Drugs Information Sheet.

The success of the Driver Fatigue Management Plan to achieve ZERO HARM ultimately rests on the willingness of everyone to co-operate and work collectively with a team spirit and above all to be accountable for their own safety and the safety of others.